Articles Posted in Boston SSDI

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When you first file a Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) claim, you will be filing that claim with the Social Security Administration (SSA) office located in downtown Boston, if you live in our area. This is actually the office for the Boston region that includes other states in the New England Area.  We are fortunate to have a local office.

SSDI Claims Boston This application will be submitted either on paper or electronically and will include a description of why you are disabled, when you became disabled, and it will be supported by medical records as well as an opinion letter from a treating physician. Continue reading →

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Social Security Disability Insurance Benefits in Boston

There are essentially two types of disability benefits programs administered by the U.S. Social Security Administration (SSA).  The first is the SSDI program.  SSDI, or Social Security Disability Insurance, is called a Title II program, because the provisions governing this Boston disability benefits program are found in Title II of the Social Security Act.  This is also the section of the Social Security Act that controls the Federal Old-Age Survivors program, of which most people are familiar when they have worked all their lives and reach the age of retirement.

Supplemental Security Income Cases in Boston

Boston SSI casesIn addition to Social Security Disability Insurance, there is also the Supplemental Security Income, or “SSI,” program.  SSI is governed by Title XVI of the Social Security Act.  This program is official called Supplemental Security Income for the Aged, Blind, and Disabled.  The program is designed to provide benefits for Americans who have reached the age of 65, are blind, or are disabled. Continue reading →

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The Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) application process –  from the time you file until you get a final decision – can be a long time.  It is quite common for these cases to take more than year.  It is also very difficult for an un-presented claimant to get a favorable outcome because the system is set up in such a way that the average claimant is very much at a disadvantage even though their respective medical doctors may have no question claimant is disabled.

SSDIThe first question you may be asking is why is it so hard to get approved for SSDI benefit?  The answer to this question basically comes down to the fact that the U.S. Social Security Administration (SSA) simply doesn’t have enough money in its budget to pay all benefits for all of the people that are truly disabled in this country.  As of now, there are around 11 million Americans who depend on SSDI or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) to make ends meet. This number is actually expected to increase, but some in congress feel that it is not the job of government to help disabled people who are unable to work and refuse to allocate the correct amount of money to properly fund this program. Continue reading →

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On the campaign trail, then-candidate Donald  Trump promised to make a lot of cuts to domestic programs. However, one program he promised to shield was the Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) program.  But now, as discussed in a recent article from the Huffington Post, Mr. Trump’s latest budget plan his administration released to Congress and the American public calls for massive cuts.

Boston SSDI LawyerSpecifically, the new budget calls for $72 billion to be cut from the Social Security disability budget over the next 10 years, and this amounts to around a 4 percent reduction.  This is part of the administration’s stated goal of balancing the federal budget while at the same time, massively increasing military spending. Continue reading →

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In a recent case from the U.S. Court of Appeals for the First Circuit, which is the circuit in which Massachusetts is located, the court held that 20.C.F.R. 422.210(c), and its five-day grace period is not applicable to cases in which the claimant does not file written exceptions to an administrative law judge’s (ALJ’s) denial leaving the appeals council without proper jurisdiction.

Boston SSDI Lawyer In this case, claimant filed for disability benefits.  Her initial application was denied and so was her written request for reconsideration.  After her request for reconsideration was denied, she filed a timely request for a hearing before an administrative law judge.  The ALJ held a hearing and found she was not entitled to benefits. Continue reading →

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President Donald J. Trump has vowed deep spending cuts across the board, save for the military.  However, Mr. Trump was able to win the election with the support of many working-class voters.SSDI

To garner their support, Trump made promises during the campaign to avoid reductions of certain federal programs on which many supporters relied – one of those being Medicaid, another being the Social Security Old Age and Retirement benefits and the other Social Security Disability Insurance.
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When a child is born with a serious disabling condition, this can impact every aspect of life. While children with disabilities are entitled to a public education, with appropriate accommodations made for their disability, disabled students generally graduate at lower rates than students who are not affected by physical or mental conditions.  SSDI lawyer

When disabled students are unable to get a high school or college education, this adversely impacts their ability to make a living. Many young people with disabilities will not be able to become self-supporting, both because of the limitations imposed by their condition and because of the challenges associated with obtaining a quality education and employment skills. These disabled children may rely on federal benefits both during their childhood and when they reach adulthood.

Parents need to understand the rules for when children may qualify for disability benefits. Children may potentially be eligible for SSI, depending upon income and resource levels when they are young and when they reach adulthood and become independent. Continue reading →

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A lawmaker in South Boston is arguing in favor of a bill to mandate state contractors hire enough disabled workers to perform contracted services so employees with disabilities make up 10 percent of the workforce. Hiring disabled workers would become a condition for any contract for services, including landscaping contracts, custodial work, mail room work, trash removal, manufacturing, and management of state and local facilities. SSDI

While the Boston Herald reports critics argue the bill would add significant costs to contracts with the state, proponents believe it would help to ensure jobs are made available to disabled people who want to work. Currently, unemployment rates in Massachusetts are very high for people with disabling conditions. With it so difficult to find work, many people who have physical or mental conditions want to try getting jobs but are not actually able to get hired.

This puts disabled workers into difficult positions, especially if they have hard time getting approved for Social Security Disability benefits. Many initial applications for disability benefits are denied, and disabled individuals often must seek help from Boston SSDI lawyers to be able to get benefits. The process can be very stressful, especially when disabled workers know their condition prevents them from having a job and recognize high unemployment rates for the disabled make the likelihood of finding work even worse. Continue reading →

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In the past few decades, autism has been getting a lot more attention, as the number of cases has grown exponentially. Research and related therapies have followed.

Boston SSDI LawyerWhile there are more services in place now than in years past to help children with autism and their families, including components of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), those attending school will either graduate or age out. For those who are on the severe end of the spectrum and their families, this can raise a host of new challenges.  A recent article from Disability Scoop discusses how the U.S. Department of Education needs to start transitioning students earlier than they do now, with a current start at the age of 16.
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College is more expensive than ever. Undergraduate tuition has risen to seemingly astronomical amounts in the past couple of decades to where most students will have no choice but to borrow huge amounts of money to attend college.  Just to get an idea of the numbers, tuition at Boston College for undergrad is just under $50,000 a year, with the cost of total attendance estimated to be more than $65,000.  People who also go graduate school are incurring around half a million dollars in debt on average, and that trend does not seem to be slowing anytime soon.

Boston SSDI LawyerThis seems okay at the time, because the plan is to go to school and then get a job that allows the borrower to pay back the loan one month at a time for the next thirty years.  However, things don’t always go as planned.  What happens to a person who takes out $250,000 in loans and then becomes disabled? There is no way a person can live on Social Security Disability Income of around $1,200 a month and still make loan payments.  One might think that this would mean you default on your student loans and don’t have to pay until you can, but that is not how it works in many cases. Continue reading →